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                                                    June 20, 2018

                                                    Brittleness and incremental improvement

                                                    Every system — computer or otherwise — needs to deal with possibilities of damage or error. If it does this well, it may be regarded as “robust”, “mature(d), “strengthened”, or simply “improved”.* Otherwise, it can reasonably be called “brittle”.

                                                    *It’s also common to use the word “harden(ed)”. But I think that’s a poor choice, as brittle things are often also hard.

                                                    0. As a general rule in IT:

                                                    There are many categories of IT strengthening. Two of the broadest are:

                                                    1. One of my more popular posts stated:

                                                    Developing a good DBMS requires 5-7 years and tens of millions of dollars.

                                                    The reasons I gave all spoke to brittleness/strengthening, most obviously in:

                                                    Those minor edge cases in which your Version 1 product works poorly aren’t minor after all.

                                                    Similar things are true for other kinds of “platform software” or distributed systems.

                                                    2. The UI brittleness/improvement story starts similarly:? Read more

                                                    July 31, 2016

                                                    Notes on Spark and Databricks — technology

                                                    During my recent visit to Databricks, I of course talked a lot about technology — largely with Reynold Xin, but a bit with Ion Stoica as well. Spark 2.0 is just coming out now, and of course has a lot of enhancements. At a high level:

                                                    The majority of Databricks’ development efforts, however, are specific to its cloud service, rather than being donated to Apache for the Spark project. Some of the details are NDA, but it seems fair to mention at least:

                                                    Two of the technical initiatives Reynold told me about seemed particularly cool. Read more

                                                    July 19, 2016

                                                    Notes on vendor lock-in

                                                    Vendor lock-in is an important subject. Everybody knows that. But few of us realize just how complicated the subject is, nor how riddled it is with paradoxes. Truth be told, I wasn’t fully aware either. But when I set out to write this post, I found that it just kept growing longer.

                                                    1. The most basic form of lock-in is:

                                                    2. Enterprise vendor standardization is closely associated with lock-in. The core idea is that you have a mandate or strong bias toward having different apps run over the same platforms, because:

                                                    3. That last point is double-edged; you have more power over suppliers to whom you give more business, but they also have more power over you. The upshot is often an ELA (Enterprise License Agreement), which commonly works:

                                                    Read more

                                                    February 15, 2016

                                                    Some checklists for making technical choices

                                                    Whenever somebody asks for my help on application technology strategy, I start by trying to ascertain three things. The absolute first is actually a prerequisite to almost any kind of useful conversation, which is to ascertain in general terms what the hell it is that we are talking about. ??

                                                    My second goal is to ascertain technology constraints. Three common types are:

                                                    That’s often a short and straightforward discussion, except in those awkward situations when all three of my bullet points above are applicable at once.

                                                    The third item is usually more interesting. I try to figure out what is to be accomplished. That’s usually not a simple matter, because the initial list of goals and requirements is almost never accurate. It’s actually more common that I have to tell somebody to be more ambitious than that I need to rein them in.

                                                    Commonly overlooked needs include:

                                                    And if you take one thing away from this post, then take this:

                                                    I guarantee it.

                                                    Read more

                                                    November 19, 2015

                                                    CDH 5.5

                                                    I talked with Cloudera shortly ahead of today’s announcement of Cloudera 5.5. Much of what we talked about had something or other to do with SQL data management. Highlights include:

                                                    While I had Cloudera on the phone, I asked a few questions about Impala adoption, specifically focused on concurrency. There was mention of: Read more

                                                    October 26, 2015

                                                    Differentiation in business intelligence

                                                    Parts of the business intelligence differentiation story resemble the one I just posted for data management. After all:

                                                    That said, insofar as BI’s competitive issues resemble those of DBMS, they are those of DBMS-lite. For example:

                                                    And full-stack analytic systems — perhaps delivered via SaaS (Software as a Service) — can moot the BI/data management distinction anyway.

                                                    Of course, there are major differences between how DBMS and BI are differentiated. The biggest are in user experience. I’d say: Read more

                                                    October 26, 2015

                                                    Differentiation in data management

                                                    In the previous post I broke product differentiation into 6-8 overlapping categories, which may be abbreviated as:

                                                    and sometimes also issues in adoption and administration.

                                                    Now let’s use this framework to examine two market categories I cover — data management and, in separate post, business intelligence.

                                                    Applying this taxonomy to data management:
                                                    Read more

                                                    October 26, 2015

                                                    Sources of differentiation

                                                    Obviously, a large fraction of what I write about involves technical differentiation. So let’s try for a framework where differentiation claims can be placed in context. This post will get through the generalities. The sequels will apply them to specific cases.

                                                    Many buying and design considerations for IT fall into six interrelated areas:? Read more

                                                    July 14, 2014

                                                    21st Century DBMS success and failure

                                                    As part of my series on the keys to and likelihood of success, I outlined some examples from the DBMS industry. The list turned out too long for a single post, so I split it up by millennia. The part on 20th Century DBMS success and failure went up Friday; in this one I’ll cover more recent events, organized in line with the original overview post. Categories addressed will include analytic RDBMS (including data warehouse appliances), NoSQL/non-SQL short-request DBMS, MySQL, PostgreSQL, NewSQL and Hadoop.

                                                    DBMS rarely have trouble with the criterion “Is there an identifiable buying process?” If an enterprise is doing application development projects, a DBMS is generally chosen for each one. And so the organization will generally have a process in place for buying DBMS, or accepting them for free. Central IT, departments, and — at least in the case of free open source stuff — developers all commonly have the capacity for DBMS acquisition.

                                                    In particular, at many enterprises either departments have the ability to buy their own analytic technology, or else IT will willingly buy and administer things for a single department. This dynamic fueled much of the early rise of analytic RDBMS.

                                                    Buyer inertia is a greater concern.

                                                    A particularly complex version of this dynamic has played out in the market for analytic RDBMS/appliances.

                                                    Otherwise I’d say:? Read more

                                                    April 30, 2014

                                                    Hardware and storage notes

                                                    My California trip last week focused mainly on software — duh! — but I had some interesting hardware/storage/architecture discussions as well, especially in the areas of:

                                                    I also got updated as to typical Hadoop hardware.

                                                    If systems are designed at the whole-rack level or higher, then there can be much more flexibility and efficiency in terms of mixing and connecting CPU, RAM and storage. The Google/Facebook/Amazon cool kids are widely understood to be following this approach, so others are naturally considering it as well. My most interesting of several mentions of that point was when I got the chance to talk with Berkeley computer architecture guru Dave Patterson, who’s working on plans for 100-petabyte/terabit-networking kinds of systems, for usage after 2020 or so. (If you’re interested, you might want to contact him; I’m sure he’d love more commercial sponsorship.)

                                                    One of Dave’s design assumptions is that Moore’s Law really will end soon (or at least greatly slow down), if by Moore’s Law you mean that every 18 months or so one can get twice as many transistors onto a chip of the same area and cost than one could before. However, while he thinks that applies to CPU and RAM, Dave thinks flash is an exception. I gathered that he thinks the power/heat reasons for Moore’s Law to end will be much harder to defeat than the other ones; note that flash, because of what it’s used for, has vastly less power running through it than CPU or RAM do.

                                                    Read more

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